7 INVENTORS KILLED BY THEIR INVENTION

Throughout history, there have been inventors that have been killed by their own inventions. Today we are going to present 7 inventors that were ironically killed by their own revolutionary inventions.

1. Francis Edgar Stanley

Francis Edgar Stanly and his brother sold their Stanley Dry Plate Company to Eastman Kodak Company. They used the money to start the Stanley motor carriage company and designed the world ’s first steam-powered car. They called it the Stanley Steamer. On June 13, 1918, Stanley died in a crash while test driving the Steamer.

2. Sylvester H Roper

After designing and building the steam-powered automobile, he then invented the first steam-powered motorcycle. Roper called his motorcycle the Roper Steam Velocity. Being able to achieve 40 miles per hour, the Roper Steam Velocity could easily outrun conventional motorcycles of the time. It was the first steam-driven bike to be inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

While driving the steam-powered bike, Roper crashed near Boston ’s Charles River bridge on June 1, 1896, and died.

3. Mary Curie

Her greatest achievement was developing the theory of radioactivity. She discovered radium and polonium and was able to isolate radioactive isotopes and used that discovery to developed the X-Ray machine.

Unfortunately, Curie died at only 66 years of age from aplastic anemia that was due to her continual lifetime exposure to radiation while conducting her research on radioactivity.

4. Lewis Slotin

Lewis Slotin was a key factor in the building of a nuclear bomb in 1945.

Then while demonstrating an experiment to his colleagues an accidental fission reaction released a burst of radiation.
Slotin’s quick actions to the accident protected his colleagues from being hit by the radiation burst and he is credited with saving their lives. But the dose of radiation that Slotin endured was lethal and he died 9 days later.

5. Franz Reichelt

Franz Reichelt was the inventor of the personal parachute that a person could wear.

Reichelt initially tested his invention by throwing dummies from his 5th-floor apartment. Although the results were encouraging and pointed to success, they were not replicable. Understanding that the height he was using in his experiments didn ’t allow the chutes to fully open he decided to conduct tests from the platform deck of the Eifel Tower.

He received permission to use the tower for tests and decided he would test his invention personally. On February 4, 1912, while friend and family begged him to reconsider and use a dummy, Reichelt strapped on the parachute and leaped from the deck of the Eifel Tower. The chute did not open and he plummeted to his death.

6. William Bullock

William Bullock invented the first modern printing press for newspapers in 1863.

On April 3, 1863, the printing press was cranking out editions of the Philadelphia Public league newspaper when Bullock noticed a drive belt was misaligned. When he kicked at the drive belt to try and get it back on the pulley his leg got entangled and crushed.

He developed gangrene and died 9 days later while doctors were operating to amputate the damaged leg.

7. Horace Lawson Hunley

During the American Civil War, Horace Lawson Hunley, James R McClintock, and Baxter Watson tried to build a submarine name “Pioneer” but the project had to be scrapped. The three men then tried to build another submarine, but it sank in Mobile Bay Alabama.

On October 15, 1863, Hunley conducted another test. This time he was personally on the submarine with 6 other crew members. During the test, the submarine again sank and all 7 men were killed.

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